Tachyornis ("swift bird")

10 ft. (3 m.) tall and long. Can sprint for short distances at speeds up to 75 mph (121 km/h) and can sustain speeds of 45 mph (72 km/h) for longer distances. It uses its long, flat tail for stabilization and its feathered wings to assist with steering and slowing when chasing down agile prey.

Digital.

9x12"

2017

Xylopod ("wooden legs")

30 ft. (9 m.) tall and long. Among the largest of bird species by size and weight. Tiny vestigial arms remain beneath plumage. Nostrils situated atop the head allow it to wade through deep channels. Named for its immense legs, said to be as wide as tree trunks with a scaly texture similar to bark.

Digital

12x16"

2017

Cyanoceratops ("blue horn-face")

3 ft. (.91 m.) long. A flightless, quadrupedal (four-legged) bird. Males have been observed to hoard blue-colored objects, hard to come across in their desert environment, in the hopes of attracting potential mates.

Oil on panel

12x16"

2017

Megaramphorus ("large beak")

Wingspan 20 ft. (6 m.) Named for its massive hollow beak used for fishing and to attract mates. Beak size (up to 5 ft. (1.5 m.)) can comprise up to a third of its total body length.

Oil on panel

16x20"

2017

Ophiraptor ("serpent robber")

Wingspan 2 ft. (.6 m.) Length 3 ft. (.91 m.) Named for its elongated, snake-like body. With wings too short for sustained flight, the arboreal (tree dwelling) Ophiraptor instead glides from tree-to-tree in search for small prey and rival species’ eggs. Male specimens grow tail feathers up to 4 ft. (1.2 m.) long during mating season.

Oil on panel

14x18"

2017

Pyropteryx ("fire wing")

Wingspan 2.5 ft. (.76 m.) Named for the flame-like plumage that males accentuate during courtship.

Oil on panel

12x16"

2017

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